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Why We Love Our Cochlear Battery: Changing the Lives of Hearing-Impaired Kids!

by rayovac11, March 2013

In recent years, cochlear implants have become more common for infants and toddlers who are experiencing moderate to severe hearing loss. As a company that manufactures the cochlear battery, we have successfully stayed on the forefront of progress regarding this technology. It’s been amazing, and we’re proud to power it.

Cochlear implants are very different from hearing aids. First off, they do not amplify sound. Instead they bypass the damaged anatomy in the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. The results can be phenomenal, but can vary from person to person. Just imagine going from near deaf to hearing in a matter of weeks.

Speech, language, and social skills are deeply interwoven and strongly related to hearing. When a child can hear well, the brain normally develops these skills organically, weaving billions of pieces of auditory input into basic skills we all use. Of course, kids with severe hearing impairment find other routes to develop these skills, but it’s a climb, rather than a cruise, for many of them.

Children as young as 12 months of age can undergo cochlear implant surgery. It generally takes between two and five hours and the benefits of the surgery will begin to arrive four to six weeks later. Though not every child is a candidate. If a child can benefit from a hearing aid, for example, that child is unlikely to qualify for a cochlear implant. Pediatric audiologists conduct the assessments to determine who qualifies. More...

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Happy Birthday to the Bionic Ear: A Cochlear Battery for your Cochlear Implant

by rayovac18, February 2013

This year marks the 30th year since a pioneering physician drastically changed the landscape for the hearing impaired. With the birth of the cochlear implant, thousands of people have rediscovered the colorful world of sound—a bird singing in the distance, the endearing voice of a grandchild, a companion telling a joke in a busy restaurant. Not surprisingly,  the cochlear battery necessary to power this “bionic ear” is a little marvel of its own.

 

Cochlear implants require a lot of energy to do their intricate work of transforming sounds into electrical energy. A hearing aid amplifies sound, but a cochlear implant relays it through wiring to the auditory nerve, a far more involved process. Just think of how many sounds enter the ear on any given day; a nearly constant stream of them. When powered on, the implant is constantly working to relay those sounds through an intricate design that bypasses the damaged portion of the ear’s anatomy. It may look a little like a watch battery, but a cochlear battery is in a whole other league. More...

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“Go Green” with Your Next Hearing Aid Battery

by rayovac18, February 2013

Need a new battery for your hearing aid? Wondering about the quality of the mercury-free varieties on the market? Mercury-free batteries possess the same reliable power and performance as their less-green predecessors but with the added value of contributing to a cleaner environment. A “green” hearing aid battery does more than just keep mercury out of landfills. They also help customers comply with newly enacted legislation that has banned mercury-containing button batteries.

What's the Mercury Fuss All About?

Every discarded battery that isn’t mercury-free contributes to an unsafe environment. When a tossed-out battery begins to degrade, the mercury it contains will seep into the ground. That tiny bit of mercury will then combine with mercury seepage from other decomposing batteries. Eventually, the accumulation can creep into our drinking water and contaminate neighboring lakes and streams. Other disturbing results include the death of wildlife and deformities it can create in their offspring. More...

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